Official website of the New Zealand Farm Forestry Association

Indigenous species - Tree Grower articles

  • Selective harvesting our indigenous forests
    Wink Sutton, November 2017
    Indigenous forests are living ecosystems. In untended indigenous forests the total standing volume usually only varies by a small amount. Although old trees die, fall over and rot on the…
  • West Melton bush block
    Peter Gatehouse, August 2015
    The open Canterbury Plain is not the easiest site to create a new native forest. Strong cold easterlies, desiccating north-westerlies, frost and periodic snow are major factors for survival. In…
  • Management of kauri dieback
    Nick Waipara, May 2013
    Our kauri is under threat from an emerging disease commonly referred to as kauri dieback. It has already killed thousands of kauri trees and will spread further unless all forest…
  • Expanding economic viability of sustainably managed indigenous beech forests and industry
    Dean Satchell, February 2012
    The workshop late in 2011 held by the School of Forestry at Canterbury University brought together stakeholders from around the country to discuss issues around this emerging industry. The workshop…
  • Survey of existing uses and market potential of naturally regenerated farm totara
    Paul Quinlan and David Bergin, February 2012
    The Northland Totara Working Group has completed a survey on the uses and market potential of naturally regenerated farm totara timber. The results are very encouraging. There was clear support…
  • Salvaging beech thinning trials – a national heritage
    Tomás Easdale, February 2012
    An important goal of forestry is to increase tree growth and improve timber yield or its quality on a sustainable basis. Controlling tree density within forest stands by thinning is…
  • Sustainable indigenous forest management Where are we in 2012?
    Alan Griffiths and Karlene Hill, February 2012
    What has been happening on the indigenous forestry front in recent times? This article looks at trends in indigenous forest management and timber production, discusses some recent initiatives and highlights…
  • Promoting indigenous forest recovery Carbon and the Permanent Forest Sink Initiative
    Ollie Belton, February 2012
    Over the past few years there has been a lot of publicity about the opportunity to make money by growing trees for carbon sequestration. New Zealand is a pioneer in…
  • A planted indigenous forestry project
    Harley and Margaret Gray, February 2012
    In the November 2005 issue of Tree Grower we wrote an article entitled ‘Starting from scratch’ which described the early stages of our small forestry project on Kaipara South Head. This is…
  • Lindsay and Dixon’s beech harvesting operation
    Ian Campbell, May 2010
    The day started well with an address to the conference at breakfast time from Bernie Lagan, co-owner of Lindsay and Dixon. Bernie outlined to us the type of operation we…
  • Totara – a growing resource
    Dave Cown, David Bergin and Paul Quinlan, November 2009
    Totara is widely distributed throughout New Zealand, from sea level to over 500 metres, on well drained flood plains and drought prone hills, and on clay to volcanic soils. Totara…
  • Nursery specifications for natives
    Miles Giller, May 2009
    Many landowners wish to promote the regeneration of native plants, for a whole variety of reasons. In an ideal world such regeneration would take place by natural processes. However there…
  • Indigenous shelter planting
    Bruce Winter, February 2009
    Our sheep farm of 196 hectares at Spar Bush, Invercargill is an amalgamation of several smaller farms. We ended up with several old homesteads which had macrocarpa planted around them.…
  • Indigenous forestry options for trading in carbon credits
    Warwick Silvester, February 2009
    The Kyoto protocol requires us to control or mitigate our carbon emissions. Trees as major carbon sinks are seen as one of the best ways to implement this. Four schemes…
  • Continuous Cover Forestry: A Handbook for the Management of New Zealand Forests by Ian Barton
    Review by Allan Levett, November 2008
    This is a timely book. Continuous cover forestry is suited to slower growing high value species. Increasing oil costs threaten export values for pine timber and call for alternatives that…
  • Weeds in indigenous forests
    Melissa Brignall-Theyer, Sarah Richardson and Susan Wiser, May 2008
    The most challenging weeds for managed indigenous forests are those that can disperse into harvested areas, prevent regeneration of native tree species or persist as potential competitors to adult native…
  • Totara – Northland’s farm forests of the future
    Helen Moodie, Paul Quinlan, David Bergin and Chris Kennedy, November 2007
    Introducing the vision, activities, objectives and profile of the Northland Totara Working Group. It may be hard for people outside Northland to imagine, but totara are so vigorous and abundant…
  • Continuous cover forestry: Management practice
    Ian Barton, May 2006
    This is the second and final part of the article on continuous cover forestry. The first part was published in the November 2005 issue of the Tree Grower. Establishing the…
  • Information sources on native tree species
    David Bergin, November 2005
    There is a large number of publications and information sources for those wanting to establish native plants, or for those embarking on management of their patch of native forest. Ensis,…
  • The new look Indigenous Forest Section
    Mike Halliday and John Wardle, November 2005
    The Indigenous Forest Section of the NZFFA was formed in August 1995, partly in response to the passing of the Forest Amendment Act 1993 and the effect this had on…
  • Continuous cover forestry - an introduction
    Ian Barton, November 2005
    This article covers the basic principles of continuous cover forestry. The second part, due to be published in the February Tree Grower, will deal with establishment, silviculture and harvesting. Continuous…
  • Black beech management
    John Wardle, November 2005
    Rosalie and I purchased a property near Oxford in the Canterbury foothills in 1973. This property had about 84 hectares of black beech regrowth, mostly dating from the 1930s, which…
  • GIS and indigenous forest management
    Roger May, February 2005
    A geographical information system (GIS) is a computerised mapping system which can be used for map production, operational planning, spatial analysis and record-keeping. The advantages of GIS The use of…

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