Official website of the New Zealand Farm Forestry Association


Advertisement
Tenco logo
About Tenco
Tenco is one of New Zealand’s largest exporters of forest products. We have built to this position since 1991 when the company was set up to export lumber to growing Asian export markets.  Experience and reputation count; from small beginnings Tenco has become the largest independent exporter of New Zealand lumber and New Zealand’s 4th largest log exporter.  Tenco has a regular shipping program of their own log vessels and in combination with these and other ships currently calls  at 7 New Zealand ports (5 North Island and 2 South Island).
 
Tenco buys standing forests.  Tenco currently has a number of forests which they purchased at harvestable age to log over a number of years for export and domestic markets.  Tenco also regularly buys smaller tracts of forest to harvest immediately or immature forests to hold until harvest time.  Tenco is interested in broadening  the  base of owners from whom it purchases forests and stands of trees.  A deal with Tenco is a certain transaction.  The owner and Tenco will agree on a value of the tree crop and then Tenco will pay this amount to the owner either in a lump sum amount or on rate per volume unit out-turn from the forest depending on the nature of the tree crop.
 
Tenco knows there are a lot of farmers who have trees that are close or ready to harvest and will be asking themselves how they should proceed with the sale of their trees.  For some farmers the kind of certain transaction with money in the bank could well be appealing. Tenco is actively interested in buying harvestable forests or trees from areas including all the North Island (except the Gisborne and East Coast districts) and Nelson & Marlborough in the South Island .
 
If you own a forest in this area (16 years and older) and are ready to enter into this kind of agreement Tenco is interested to develop something with you.
Please contact: Josh.Bannan@tenco.co.nz 
Work: +64 7 357 5356  Mobile:  +64 21 921 595  www.tenco.co.nz
Logging

July, 2020

 Feds telling their members they can’t sell land for forestry

The Forest Owners Association is startled that the new Federated Farmers Meat and Wool Chair is asking the government to restrict the right of farmer members to plant trees or sell their land for forestry.

Recently elected Meat and Wool Chair, William Beetham, has issued a media release calling what he says is the announced intention of the government to restrict forest planting as a ‘step in the right direction’.

Forest Owners Association President, Phil Taylor, says he is concerned that Federated Farmers have taken a hard and emotive line since the election of their new executive late last month.

“The Feds have previously strongly supported the right of landowners to make their own decisions about what to do with their own land.”

“There are many farmers who have woodlots.  Beef + Lamb NZ has recently stated that this amounts to 180,000 hectares over New Zealand farmland.”

“Much of this would have been planted by farmers who realise the long-term farming prospects on marginal country are not good, and they feel more economically secure in planting much of their farm in trees.”

Phil Taylor says the Feds’ claims about the economics of afforestation are quite wrong.

“Per hectare, per year, the export returns from forestry are way above the returns from sheep and beef farming.  Forestry will save many rural communities.”

“Employment in forestry, from the same area, is also above that from hill country farming.”

Phil Taylor says the Feds’ statement is also illogical.

“Mr Beetham demands government protection for what he calls his ‘vital food and fibre industry’.  But, even before the recent wool-price crash, the yearly New Zealand export return from wool is only one tenth of the return from products made from wood - which is a fibre too.”

“This is not the 1960s anymore.  Economies change.”

Phil Taylor says he is amazed at the added demand that the government should also stop the more marginal land being planted in trees.

“Foresters have little interest in the highly fertile land.  It is too expensive.  But it’s unbelievable that Mr Beetham should insist that marginal East Coast country, with a Land Use Capability rating of six or higher, should also be considered for restrictions.”

“Some of this land can’t support farming any more.  Much of it is in severe drought with NIWA predictions for this happening more often.  These farmers are facing huge costs of fencing off waterways under the impending freshwater discharge rules.”

“These are farmers who want to sell out or plant productive forests themselves.  However, the message from Federated Farmers is to tell the government to block this opportunity for their own farmer members.”

Phil Taylor

‘ph 027 487 6890

Farm Forestry - Headlines