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July, 2022


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Tenco is one of New Zealand’s largest exporters of forest products. We have built to this position since 1991 when the company was set up to export lumber to growing Asian export markets.  Experience and reputation count; from small beginnings Tenco has become the largest independent exporter of New Zealand lumber and New Zealand’s 4th largest log exporter.  Tenco has a regular shipping program of their own log vessels and in combination with these and other ships currently calls  at 7 New Zealand ports (5 North Island and 2 South Island).
 
Tenco buys standing forests. Tenco regularly buys smaller tracts of forest to harvest immediately or immature forests to hold until harvest time. A deal with Tenco is a certain transaction. The owner and Tenco will agree on a value of the tree crop and then Tenco will pay this amount to the owner either in a lump sum amount or on rate per volume unit out-turn from the forest depending on the nature of the tree crop.

Tenco is actively interested in buying harvestable forests or trees from areas including all the North Island (except the Gisborne and East Coast districts) and Nelson & Marlborough in the South Island .
 
If you own a forest in this area (16 years and older) and are ready to enter into this kind of agreement Tenco is interested to develop something with you.
Please contact: Josh.Bannan@tenco.co.nz 
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Trees on Your Farm – Pilot Workshops

In May, members of the NZFFA held three pilot workshops in the lower North Island aimed at encouraging hill country farmers to grow more trees. The format was a day of presentations followed by a half-day field trip. Te Uru Rakau funded the events which were free to attendees. 

The aim was to attract non-members who knew little about trees, but it was only partially successful. Some of the attendees were officials, council officers and consultants; some were farmers already growing trees but wanting to know more; and some were NZFFA members who came along to see what we were doing. To avoid attracting too many of these we chose not to advertise in the NZFFA newsletter or on the website, but now that it’s over we can freely share the materials we presented. Below are links to the presentations.

For those not familiar with Google Docs the presentations look and feel like Powerpoint slides. The ‘Slideshow’ button should be near the top right hand corner of your screen, and the audio should start automatically with each one. To view the speaker notes, ‘Escape’ the slideshow and tick the ‘Show speaker notes’ option under the ‘View’ button. Then move your cursor just below the picture of the slide and half way across its width, when a Hand icon should appear. Click on that and use it to push the picture up making it smaller, which will show the speaker notes below. You will find the email address of the speaker in the notes, should you wish to ask questions or offer suggestions. 

The workshop handout is available as a PDF.

There are 12 modules available as slides below. They vary in length from a few minutes to about half an hour. 

For those not familiar with Google Docs, the presentations look and feel like Powerpoint slides.  The ‘Slideshow’ button should be near the top right hand corner of your screen:

The audio should start automatically with each one. Look at the bottom left hand corner to click for the next slide:

To view the speaker notes, use the ‘Escape’ key to exit the fullscreen slideshow. Check that the ‘Show speaker notes’ option is ticked under the ‘View’ button. Then move your cursor just below the picture of the slide and half way across its width, when a Hand icon should appear.  Click on that and use it to push the picture up, making it smaller, and this will show the speaker notes below.  You will find the email address of the speaker in the notes, should you wish to ask questions. 

The modules are:

  1. Introduction
  2. Where to plant
  3. Planning a woodlot
  4. Establishing a woodlot
  5. Managing a woodlot
  6. Harvesting and marketing
  7. Species choice
  8. Native trees
  9. Regulations, cash & tax
  10. Emissions trading scheme
  11. He Waka Eke Noa
  12. Trees protect farms

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