Official website of the New Zealand Farm Forestry Association

Secretary: Peter & Glenda Berg
1155 Wharehine Road
RD 3
Wellsford
0973
09 423 7030
peter@bergforests.co.nz
Secretary login

Indigenous Forest Section

Indigenous Forest Section membership page »
  • Report: Trees for steep slopes - Southern beech
    Dean Satchell, July 2018 (Access: unrestricted)
    A number of Southern beech species are indigenous to New Zealand. These are all evergreen broadleaved hardwoods and include silver beech, red beech, hard beech, black beech and mountain beech. Leaf shape…
  • Report: Trees for steep slopes - kauri
    Dean Satchell, July 2018 (Access: unrestricted)
    Kauri (Agathis australis) has long been regarded as the Lord of the Forest, the dominant tree species of the natural rainforest in northern New Zealand, with diameters of 6 m…
  • Report: Trees for steep slopes - manuka
    Dean Satchell, July 2018 (Access: unrestricted)
    Mānuka is not a plantation forestry species for timber, but there is considerable interest in plantations for producing honey. There has been international acceptance of the medicinal properties of mānuka honey,…
  • Report: Trees for steep slopes - totara
    Dean Satchell, July 2018 (Access: unrestricted)
    Totara is a native conifer and member of the podocarp family, with two species growing into large trees, Podocarpus totara and P. hallii. These species naturally hybridise (Bergin, 2003), with P. hallii being predominant in…

Species information

  • Establishing native hardwood trees for timber
    NZFFA Information leaflet No. 24 (2005). There is in New Zealand a constant demand for high quality wood products made from native species, including hardwoods, principally for joinery, furniture and the…
  • Natives for Timber or Amenity
    Nothing can be more rewarding for a forester than creating and nurturing a native plantation from 10 years on their size, growth rate, form and rapid maturation looks and feels…
  • Growing NZ Beech for timber
    New Zealand has five native beech species, commonly known as red, black, silver, mountain and hard beech, each with a different natural geographic distribution. Of the five, red beech (Fusca fuscospora)…
  • Growing totara for timber
    Totara (Podocarpus totara) is one of New Zealand’s most easily grown native species. It has an extensive natural range and tolerates a wide variety of sites. It readily regenerates from…

(top)

Other sources of information

  • Wardle’s Native Trees of New Zealand
    Wardle, J., & Platt, I. p. (2011). Wellington: Bateson Publishing. 
    A comprehensive and accessible guide with over 300 colour photographs. Each tree species is described and illustrated, and the botanical and ecological details are supplemented with information about their uses. Order your copy »
  • Bush Vitality Assessment
    Janssen, H. (2006). Bush Vitality Assessment (revised edition). New Zealand: Helmut Janssen.
    A visual assessment kit for native bush, especially small remnant areas. Also has information on establishing new forest, the use of exotics, and erosion control.
  • Expanding economic viability for sustainably managed indigenous beech forests
    Donnelly, R. H. (2011). Expanding Economic Viability for Sustainably Managed Indigenous Beech Forests. Christchurch: NZ School of Forestry.
    Comprehensive report focusing on markets and the market potential for indigenous beech. SFF project 05/048, co-funded by University of Canterbury, NZFFA, Maori Trustee.
  • Indigenous forestry: Sustainable Management 
    NZ Ministry of Forestry, & NZ Farm Forestry Association. (1998). Indigenous Forestry: Sustainable Management. Wellington, NZ: NZ Ministry of Forestry.
    Handbook, general guide to principles and practice of indigenous forestry; focus on management of existing forest. Covers all aspects (but now being superceded by Tane’s Tree Trust publications).
  • Farming with Native Trees: A guide for farmers from Northland to Waikato.
    NZ Indigenous Tree Bulletin No. 5
    Mike Dodd and Helen Ritchie (eds)
    Practical advice plus a range of case studies from the northern North Island but relevant to other areas.
  • Kauri: ecology, establishment, growth and management.
    NZ Indigenous Tree Bulletin No. 2 
    David Bergin and Greg Steward 
    Accessible, practical information produced in full colour. Best current information on all aspects of growing and utilising kauri
  • Native forest restoration: A practical guide for landowners
    Porteous, T. (1993). Native Forest Restoration: A practical guide for landowners. Welliington, NZ: Queen ELizabeth the Second National Trust.
    Very useful practical handbook. Mostly covers environmental restoration but much detail on propagation, site preparation, planting and maintenance.
  • Native Trees: Planting and early management for wood production, NZ Indigenous Tree Bulletin No. 3
    Bergin, D., & Gea, L. (2005) New Zealand Indigenous Tree Bulletin No. 3 (pp. 44). Rotorua: NZ Forest Research Institute.
    Accessible, practical information produced in full colour. Best current information on all aspects of growing and utilising most important native species.
  • New Zealand’s Native Trees
    Dawson, J., & Lucas, R. (2012). New Zealand's Native Trees. New Zealand: Craig Potton Publishing.
    Award-winning book: comprehensive coverage and botanical photos of all NZ’s native species.
  • Plant Materials Handbook for Soil Conservation, Vol. 3: Native Plants
    Hathaway R.L. (1986) Vol 3: Native Plants. Wellington: National Soil and Water Conservation Authority. 
    Using native plants for soil conservation.
  • Pohutukawa: ecology, establishment, growth and management, NZ Indigenous Tree Bulletin No. 4
    Bergin, D., & Hosking, G. (2006) Pohutakawa: Ecology, establishment, growth and management. New Zealand Indigenous Tree Bulletin Series No. 4 (pp. 104). Rotorua: NZ Forest Research Institute.
    Accessible, practical information produced in full colour. More on conservation / ecological values than other bulletins in this series but does have details of timber use, growth and forestry potential.
  • Sherry river native plant establishment: ‘Best bet’ guidelines.
    Nick Ledgard and David Henley, 2009. Scion, PO Box 29237, Fendalton, Christchurch
    A practical, well-illustrated 8-page guide designed specifically for inland northern South Island – but basic principles would apply to most sites.
  • Planting and Managing Native Trees: Tane’s Tree Trust Technical Handbook
    2011, Tane’s Tree Trust.
    Comprehensive set of full-colour notes covering various aspects of indigenous forestry. Focus on establishment of new plantations. Regularly updated and added to.
  • The Native Trees of New Zealand 
    Salmon, J. T. (1986). The Native Treees of New Zealand: Reed Methuen.
    Botanical emphasis
  • The New Zealand Beeches: Ecology, utilisation and management
    Wardle, J. (1984). Wellington: NZ Forest Service.
    Slightly out of date on management aspects but excellent for ecology of the beeches.
  • The New Zealand beeches: establishment, growth and management, NZ Indigenous Tree Bulletin No. 6
    Smale, S., Bergin, D., & Steward, G. (2012). New Zealand Indigenous Tree Bulletin No. 6 (pp. 64). Rotorua: NZ Forest Research Institute. 
    Full colour handbook covering all NZ’s beech species. Incudes management of natural stands and some information on establishing new plantations. Best available information on all aspects of growing and utilising the beech species.
  • Totara: establishment, growth and management NZ Indigenous Tree Bulletin No.1
    Bergin, D. (2003). New Zealand Indigenous Tree Bulletin No. 1 (pp. 40). Rotorua: NZ Forest Research Institute.
    Full colour handbook: practical advice on growing and managing totara in NZ.
  • Totara: Existing uses and market development opportunities for naturally regenerating totara timber
    Quinlan, P., & Northland Totara Working Group. (2011). NZ Landcare Trust. Sustainable Farming Fund. Northland Totara Working Group.
    Comprehensive report with practical information about harvesting, processing and marketing totara. Northland focus but relevant elsewhere. SFF project (L10/145).
  • Alternatives to heart kauri for boat-building: Bending properties of planks of clear and finger-jointed radiata pine and second-growth kauri
    FRI Bulletin No. 27, Parker, J. R. (1983).
  • The Seasoning of New Zealand Beech Species
    Utilisation Development Division Report No. 14, R.K. Bagnall (1971).
  • The Air Drying of Beech in Westland and Nelson
    Utilisation Development Division Report No. 9, NC Clifton (1968).
  • The Utilisation of Hard Beech (a) Sawing Studies at Three West Coast Sawmills
    Utilisation Development Division Report No. 54, JC Vaney, RK Bagnall, DR Page (1976).
  • The Utilisation of Hard Beech (b) Application of a four Stage Seasoning Schedule
    Utilisation Development Division Report No. 55, JC Vaney (1976).
  • The Utilisation of Hard Beech (c) Suitability for Manufactured Products
    Utilisation Development Division Report No. 56, JC Vaney, RK Bagnall, REJ Docking (1976).
  • Riccarton Bush: Putaringamotu
    Brian Molloy (ed) 1995
    Detailed description of managing a bush block, including excellent ecological history of Canterbury.
  • Standards and Guidelines for the Sustainable Management of Indigenous Forests (3rd edition)
    NZ Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF). (2007). (3 ed.). Rotorua: Indigenous Forestry Unit, MAF Policy. (The framework for MAF (now MPI) sustainable forest management plans and permits).
(top)

Farm Forestry - Headlines