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About Tenco
Tenco is one of New Zealand’s largest exporters of forest products. We have built to this position since 1991 when the company was set up to export lumber to growing Asian export markets.  Experience and reputation count; from small beginnings Tenco has become the largest independent exporter of New Zealand lumber and New Zealand’s 4th largest log exporter.  Tenco has a regular shipping program of their own log vessels and in combination with these and other ships currently calls  at 7 New Zealand ports (5 North Island and 2 South Island).
 
Tenco buys standing forests.  Tenco currently has a number of forests which they purchased at harvestable age to log over a number of years for export and domestic markets.  Tenco also regularly buys smaller tracts of forest to harvest immediately or immature forests to hold until harvest time.  Tenco is interested in broadening  the  base of owners from whom it purchases forests and stands of trees.  A deal with Tenco is a certain transaction.  The owner and Tenco will agree on a value of the tree crop and then Tenco will pay this amount to the owner either in a lump sum amount or on rate per volume unit out-turn from the forest depending on the nature of the tree crop.
 
Tenco knows there are a lot of farmers who have trees that are close or ready to harvest and will be asking themselves how they should proceed with the sale of their trees.  For some farmers the kind of certain transaction with money in the bank could well be appealing. Tenco is actively interested in buying harvestable forests or trees from areas including all the North Island (except the Gisborne and East Coast districts) and Nelson & Marlborough in the South Island .
 

If you own a forest in this area (16 years and older) and are ready to enter into this kind of agreement Tenco is interested to develop something with you.
Please contact: Josh.Bannan@tenco.co.nz 
Work: +64 7 357 5356  Mobile:  +64 21 921 595  www.tenco.co.nz
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NZFFA Member Blogs

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Member Blogs


Recent blogs:

Farm forestry to merge with NZ Forest Owners?

Nick Ledgard's Blog
Friday, December 16, 2016

Should the NZ Farm Forestry Association (NZFFA) merge with the NZ Forest Owners Association (NZFOA) to possibly form the NZ Forest Growers Association? This was the main item on the agenda of the FFA Council meeting held in Wellington recently (Nov 9). The Council is made up of single representatives (Councillors) from every FFA branch and Action Group, and offers the opportunity for members to guide the National Executive in its decision-making. There were 28 Councillors present at the Wellington meeting.

Needless to say, we had some vigorous discussion on this important topic. It has mainly been brought about by the Forest Growers Levy, which has created a large fund for deployment by the forest ‘industry’. A work programme is proposed by a range of levy committees, each addressing a different aspect of forestry (biosecurity, health and safety, fire, transport etc). This programme goes via a ‘servicing’ Secretariat for final approval by the Levy Trust Board. The levy has been in place for 3 years, and has resulted in the Trust being in a robust financial position, with a work programme which continues to grow. The small grower (FFA) is well represented on the Trust and its underlying committees, but Secretariat control largely rests with the FOA.

The main case for a merger between FFA and FOA is one of operational efficiency. At the moment, the levy governance structure involves both bodies in many levels of administration and reporting – which leads to additional costs. The point was also made at the meeting that the Government would be happier liaising with one forestry body – not two.

Even though outsiders might see the FFA as being ‘small fry’ in the forest industry compared to the corporate FOA ‘big boys’, the Levy has greatly increased the FFA’s importance. This is because we represent 12-14,000 small forest growers (SFGs) who own an increasingly large percentage of the mature national forest estate. Even though very few SFGs are FFA members, they pay a levy on all harvested trees, and therefore must have a say in Levy Trust decision-making. The FFA is required to represent these SFGs, thus forming a powerful lobby group. Hence, the interest of the forest owners (FOA) in formalising a closer relationship with the FFA.

Councillors at the Wellington FFA meeting were presented with a ‘position’ paper on a merger and the possible formation of a single Forest Growers Association. As can be imagined, the main fear of those present was that a merger might end up as a ‘sub-merger’ of the FFA, and that we would lose our unique character and identity. The need to safeguard against such a loss was underlined by a reported comment from a key FOA member who attended our last FFA conference in Hokitika. He particularly noted and admired the high level of ‘passion and enthusiasm’ that was so obvious at that event. We take such passion as the ‘norm’, but I (Ed) can assure you that it is not nearly so evident at comparable ‘industry’ gatherings.

The Wellington meeting concluded that it was currently a little premature to make decisions for or against a merger. We felt that first of all there is a need to evolve the Governance structure of the Levy administration, particularly relative to the representation of the FFA at certain levels. To this end, the following motion was approved ‘That the FFA Council recommends that the FFA Executive work with the FOA to improve the structure, governance and equity of Levy administration’. (Bolding by me)

Another important issue addressed at the meeting was the vastly increased administration workload faced by our national Executive – much of it directly related to new responsibilities brought about by the Levy. As nearly all of us are volunteers, the Association just does not have the resources of time and skills to meet these commitments effectively. Amongst the suggestions made for addressing this problem, was the obvious one of proper payment for the services required (maybe via outside consultants). But we just do not have the budget for that, so at this point in time there is no simple solution.

The farm forestry movement has been in existence for 60 years, and there is evidence out there that it is on the decline. Membership is falling, many branches struggle to keep going, and the national Executive is overcommitted. However, the Levy has definitely given the FFA greater power and impetus, together with new opportunities which we must try to embrace. This was endorsed by the Wellington Council meeting, at which the Branches were well represented. But a core question still remains – how do we, at both the Executive and the branch level, rise to meet these new challenges? 


A Forest Flows

Chris Perley's Blog
Friday, November 25, 2016

I am a forester; in the old sense of the word. I want to reclaim the name, to give it again the sense of guardianship of a people and a place which is spatial, structural, dynamic, and timeless; a guardianship which sees our short stay here as one step along a path, which sustains a place of function that gives of multiple values, and shifts in shape and form through four dimensions … and others of the mind. A forester used to be far more than an agronomist. They were verderers (responsible for the green), guardians of the forest common, and common law, and the rights and responsibilities of commoners, and with equal status to the Sheriff.

I want to reclaim that word ‘forest’, to take it back to the French forêt – even beyond. A forest was vert (green) and venison (meat), game, hunt, wolf, prey, browse, graze, forage, arable fields, villages, halls, fungi, recreation, procreation, herb, fruit, nut, of rights to mast and turbary and marl, of wild food, charcoal, fuel, wood, tool making, even refuge. A forester is, as Jack Westoby said, concerned not just with the forest, but with how the forest can serve people. Not just the mill.

Such a forest is not a ‘crop’. No forester merely ‘scientifically manages’ that crop. That we leave to the agronomic technocrats who must reduce meaning of complex natural and social beings in order to fit some delusion of concrete form that behaves within the model: the ‘fallacy of misplaced concreteness’.

"All things flow, nothing abides. You cannot step into the same river twice, for the waters are continually flowing on. Nothing is permanent except change." Heraclitus

Forests are as Alfred North Whitehead argued for all objects. No forest has a simple spatial or temporal location. They shift, they extend, they change, they are influenced from their position within a geography, a history, and through the changing lens of humanity and other beasts. They are complex, adaptive, alive, and beautiful. They are verbs, not nouns. They are defined by process, not structure. “All things flow” is what Whitehead said, as all things are integrated, and inseparable from the observer. What we see, we see through the filters in our minds given to us by our culture.

It is because forests are unbounded, complex, adaptive and dynamic that they don’t behalf as factories do; they are more organic than material. The ‘forest as factory’ idea is an abstract, an ideal; it is ‘anti-real’ in the sense that it is a representation of reality made useful because it provides a working model – an illusion – for those who think in a mechanical way, with all the emphasis on hierarchy and control, and all the delusions of how the scientific managers are those that ‘know’ a forest. To think of a forest as a ‘resource’ is to dissect it, divest it of essence. To think of a forest in this way imprisons an experience of all the senses into a prison cage.

You can sense a forest. Ball’s Clearing is a Podocarp-Hardwood remnant adjacent to a frost flat (the clearing) beneath the Kaweka Range, inland Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. As a child it was nothing short of a wonderland of sense and mind-changing experience. There is energy, life, breathing, pulsing, tenor, bass and baritone sounds of boughs and birds, multi-scented, multilayered, multi-coloured, moving, swaying, height, awe, grandeur, and welcoming grace. Because I was no artist – perhaps those best at knowing and representing this sense of place – I chose a future as a forester, for the sake of forest ecology. Ball’s Clearing is a forest as a system, subjective, moving, death and renewal. There is no factory here, unless it is one trapped inside someone’s mind.

That forest-as-factory ideal is a useful mirror to reflect back to the agronomists their prior belief. And this belief is hardly, if ever, questioned, because to do so would involve looking beyond the mirror, to try to catch a glimpse of the real world where scientific method cannot go. Beyond the mirror is the realm of philosophy, experience, intuition, sense – the real world, connected, dynamic, difficult to define in any static structural sense: “Without doubt, if we are to go back to that ultimate, integral experience, unwarped by sophistications of theory, that experience whose elucidation is the final aim of philosophy, the flux of things is one ultimate generalisation around which we must weave our philosophical system,” wrote Whitehead.

Whitehead even had a phrase for ‘becoming’, for being influenced by a moment such as a boy’s visit to a rich forest ecosystem. An ‘actual occasion’ is this process of becoming. It is not a mere event. In complex systems theory today we might refer to it as the adapting of a complex, me.

There have been other ‘actual occasions’. You can be taught ecology, but there is a moment when you get it – lying on your back listening to bird calls after plotting up and down the change from gullies to sunny or shady aspects. The plot data shows one ‘truth’, a snapshot. The experience of variation and connection you feel in a small forest site and how it relates to the dynamic context around you gives another, and it is far deeper.

And if you like land, and have a sense for it, you can see the same integrated patterns and processes working through space and time outside the forest, across the wider landscape.

These challenges to the definition of forests go beyond what they are. It also extends to what they do, their purpose, and what relationships they have within their geographic space, within their on-going path of history, and to humanity. Are we one inclusive part of these natural systems, or excluded outsiders who draw upon ‘objective’ forests for sustenance or the occasional visit?

The modern view would have us the latter, excluded, and the forest as ‘resource’ – the either ‘preservationist’ or ‘resourcist’ dichotomy that provides no place for people. The developer and the preservationist fight each other for where the fence will go between their two sides of the same coin, and they both fight those that try to live, nurture, and harvest within a space.

The past and – in my view essentially – the future view would have us the former, integral, included.

We need to move away from our current modernist debasement of truth – the structuralism, the mechanical ontology, the simplification, the reduction and dissection, the denial of the richer parts of sense experience, the dis-integration of people from their space. These ideas are just that, ideas. They are not only false, they are inhumane, and underpin the debasement of our natural forest systems to accommodate a desire for more easy measurement, control, ‘utilisation’, modelling, and concepts of allocation and ‘ownership’. That debasement is not ‘truth’, it is ‘convenience’. It does not maintain value and adaptable philosophical enquiry, it degrades thought and assigns tasks.

And that modern debasement applies to all land, and the people it would call ‘resource’ as well.

Chris Perley
2nd March 2013

And I couldn’t resist quoting this …
“This is a trait I admire about foresters: they think big. Some of the greatest thinkers about the American landscape were foresters, including Gifford Pinchot, Aldo Leopold, and Benton MacKaye. …… Maybe this bigger picture has to do with the roots of the word ‘forest’: the place outside the king’s garden, the place beyond.”
Robert Sullivan 2014 ‘Forest farewell: an ode to an iconic tree’ Orion Mar/April 2014 p61



Disclaimer: Personal views expressed in this blog are those of the writers and do not necessarily represent those of the NZ Farm Forestry Association.

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